Constantly Provoking Our Own Thinking

There is no doubt that the concept of student agency is out there in the education community. However, it seems that many of the conversations seem to be mainly floating around the pedagogical level, with the main focus being “How do we do it?”

I think if we, as an education community, remain only on the pedagogical level, then we’re missing the point.

Conversations about student agency need to dive down below the pedagogical to the philosophical and also political level. As educators we must be critically thinking about and engaging in conversations centering around: power, compliance, control, democracy, freedom and children’s rights. Specifically what those concepts look like… or don’t look like… or should look like… in schools and classrooms.

Yet, this is quite hard hard to do because many of us are products of the education system ourselves. Which means we have 20, 30, 40+ years in the current paradigm – both as students and then as educators. This can make it very difficult for us to stand outside the system in order to objectively and critically analyze it.

So I think it’s crucial that we continue to provoke our own thinking, and each other’s thinking, about these concepts. And one of the best ways we can do that is by choosing to expose ourselves and each other to provocations. Different stimuli that make us confront our own thoughts and feelings and presumptions and biases. Things that make us not only think, but also feel. Things that provoke our emotions, as a way to notice, explore and understand our own thinking.

Over the past year I’ve been slowly collecting an array of provocative quotes, tweets, images, cartoons and sketchnotes that I’ve come across that have provoked my own thinking and emotions. I’ve begun to share them in the workshops I lead about student agency to help other educators confront their thinking and feelings too. So I thought, why not share them here as well!?

So here is my personal collection of student agency provocations to get us, as a larger education community, feeling… thinking… discussing… not just about the “how” of student agency, but more importantly about the “why”.

(Links to more provocations)

Agency and the rise of “new power” (article)

Sir Ken Robinson – Bring on the learning revolution (Ted Talk)

Sir Ken Robinson – Do schools kill creativity? (Ted Talk)

7 Sins of our Forced Education System (article)

What works can hurt – side effects in education (academic journal) (and keynote speech)

The Future of Human Work is Imagination, Creativity and Strategy (article)

The role agency plays in happy children (article)

What kids need from grown-ups, but aren’t getting (article)

10 provocative quotes from “Deschooling Society” (article)

The case for the self-driven child (book review/interview with author)

Why school is not ready for us (Tedx Talk)

What skills will employers value in 2020? (article)

Kids don’t fail school… school fails kids (article)

Are we ready for exponential change (video)

What works may hurt – side effects in education (video)

What student agency provocations would you add to the collection?

What has helped provoke your thinking about power, compliance, control, freedom and children’s rights?

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2 thoughts on “Constantly Provoking Our Own Thinking

  1. What fabulous images, quotes and thoughts to provoke our thinking Taryn – thank you for sharing them! What you say really resonates with me in that simply focussing on what we DO (and say) in the classroom is insufficient in itself in the transformative process and a move towards genuine learner agency (Fiona Zinn describes it as pedagogical wallpapering!) Having said that, for some educators, starting WITH the pedagogy can be the very thing that shifts thinking. Trying new ways of questioning, reframing our vocabulary, designing learning engagements to allow for more student choice and voice, emphasising process over product…these pedagogical shifts CAN (but don’t always) then start to unsettle and challenge deeper layers of our teaching identity. Especially if they are accompanied by critical reflection. I have found over the years that the different entry points – sometimes political, sometimes philosophical, sometimes theoretical, sometimes pedagogical – work in different ways for different people. Ultimately though, we seek congruence across them all. I love the way shifting pedagogy can start to challenge deeply helps beliefs and the other way around! Its all so fascinating. Thank you for the work you are doing and the contributions you are making to teachers’ thinking. You are making a difference 🙂 Kath

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